Tag Archives: letting go

variations on letting go

You only lose what you cling to.— Siddhārtha Gautama


photo by Daisypops1.


***

I wanted you to make a jar
for certain dark sections of the heart…
and a jar open on all sides — a freedom jar —
that would hold only what wished to be held.

— Stephen Dunn

What if that was the way we held onto everything in life — a touch that both held and let go at the same time? Is that the essence of a life truly lived?

***

I love this song by Gaura Vani and as Kindred Spirits. I listen to it almost every day and try to listen to myself to find what I need to surrender. What is holding me back? What is pushing me forward? What can I do to be here in the present?

***

For the first time in my yoga practice, I went into balasana (child’s pose) and stayed there for a large part of the sequence. The students surrounding me flowed into virabhadrasana one, prasarita padottanasana, sirasana and I breathed and let go into the floor, feeling the way the pressure of their feet into the wood softly moved me ever so slightly from side to side, feeling the way my breath allowed me to slowly let go of the tension I had been carrying.

The teacher had told us to return to child’s pose if we needed to rest but also if we started to drift out of our self and our practice into the practice of someone else in the crowded room. It was the first time I had heard of using child’s pose in this way to return to yourself.

Instead of shaming myself for taking this rest, I let go of my expectations and opened my heart to my gratitude for the practice, my gratitude for my coming to class when I was so tired, my gratitude to just be with myself in this room full of people who wanted to be with themselves yet together at the same time.

***

In the Yoga Sutras, Patanjali talks about the effort of practice and non-attachment in yoga. We must practice for a long time, unceasingly and with love to secure the long-lasting effects of peace and quieting that yoga has on the fluctuations of the mind but at the same time we must not be attached to the outcomes of our practice. Our practice is a freedom jar in a sense.

Yoga, as well as life, is the work of practicing, working, growing while simultaneously letting go, detaching from expectations and desires. The alternation between working and letting go can be seen in each cycle of breath we take. We fill and grow on each inhale and release and let go on each exhale. We can’t fight the exchanges of breath. We accept each new cycle of breath, giving and receiving with all of those around us and accepting our interconnectedness with each new breath.

–lissa

I-15What is YIOM?

Advertisements

letting go is love

If you want to be… let go.

Letting go is not getting rid of. Letting go is letting be… In the end, we discover that to love and let go are the same thing. Both ways do not seek to possess. — Jack Kornfield

***

My old apartment had a spot on the living room floor that radiated warmth. It probably was in close proximity to a radiator in the apartment below mine, but I liked to think that it existed for the sheer pleasure of my feet’s touch.

I would trace my feet along its boundaries, feel the divide between warmth and cold, and wonder if it was a love story meant for only a few tiles to share. It didn’t matter that the whole room wanted to be loved. I wanted to be loved.

Every time I rediscovered it, it put my entire body at ease. Sometimes, I would lay my whole body on the floor. The warmth could hold my hands, cheek, chest, and the beginning inches of my waist all at once.

I would curl my body as tightly into the fetal position as I could and try to contain the warmth. Slowly, my body would start to shake. It was time to let go, and this fact never changed no matter how much I struggled. It always escaped me too soon, and the cold would run up my spine like a shiver.

***

To say the least, letting go is just something I did not do up until about five years ago. I carried every negative, shameful event and feeling that I could with me. It’s no wonder that so many parts of my body are so tight. I wrapped my story, the sad one that I would not let go of, into my hips, my hamstrings, my trapezius, anywhere I could fit it. This is one of the main reasons I don’t get discouraged with my limited flexibility in many poses. I know that those areas of tightness are old wounds, old sadness. I’m not going to force myself deeper into poses to get rid of them. I’m going to be patient and let yoga be a form of love for my present, past, and future and offer love, offer forgiveness, and offer acceptance in the form of my breath.

One of the things that I am most thankful for in my yoga practice is the lessons it has taught me in letting go. I feel like each exhale, each time I smile when I fall out of a pose, each time I close my eyes in a balance pose is a road map straight into the heart of letting go. My yoga practice has made me very aware of the things that I carry and the things I can let go of.

Letting go doesn’t mean losing or giving up. It’s a form of healing  and forgiveness. It’s a form of love and it creates space for more love.

What are some things that you do to let go?

–lissa

photo by Walkabout Wolf.

What is YIOM?